Legends and Heroes

86 Comments

[For detailed reminiscences of the 1983 World Cup, please read this.]

[Update: I was invited to do a much shorter version of the above post for the BBC. It was for their Hindi edition. The article is here. The translation to Hindi was, needless to say, not done by me. Neither did I give the title of “Dekho Maine dekha tha ek sapna”….after all without a “Phoolon ke seher main hain ghar aapna” the words lose much of its meaning.]

Many many years hence when I sit on a porch, rocking on an armchair with a shawl wrapped around me and a cup of tea with thin arrowroot biscuits in hand, I shall , in the manner of grandparents, smile self-contentedly and tell a group of wide-eyed children, voice soaked in trembling emotion —” Yes I saw it. I was there. Sometimes in front of a radio and sometimes a television. It happened right in front of me”.

I shall tell them of a red-handkerchiefed wizard who with bat and ball subdued the most powerful dragons of his time. I shall recount stories of how I, all of seven years, was in drawing class, holding my paintbrush still lest I miss the sounds of the radio and the accompanying cries of “chakka” (six) from the adjoining tea stall as India recovered from 5 down for 17. I shall wax eloquent on Balwinder Singh Sandhu’s magical out-and-in swing delivery and about the arrogance of the most powerful Dragon Viv Richards whose mis-timed pull led to the most memorable catch to be ever taken by an Indian cricket player.

I shall tell them how that victory on June 25, 1983 laid the seeds of a revolution. Of how the World Cup set in motion a sequence of events that culminated in cricket becoming a national obsession and a multi-billion empire within the next twenty years. And how that glorious summer day taught a perennially under-performing nation lacking in self-belief, that yes we “could do it”.

Of course do expect me to embellish my tales—-in my stories Yashpal Sharma will become a powerful bull of a man, Madan Lal a force of nature, Sandip Patil one of the greatest batsmen we had, Balwinder Singh Sandhu an elf. In my yarns, Malcolm Marshall will be hurling deliveries at the speed of sound, Joel Garner would be fifteen feet tall, Clive Llloyd would be wielding a 20 Kg bat and Kapil Dev would have driven a BSA SLR bicycle into Lords seconds before the final. And I would have known all along that India would win.

After all, it is the prerogative of the tellers of history to be able to add something of themselves in the story they tell.

Else how can history become legend and ultimately myth?

I shall of course not explain the sad irony behind the fact that the players who brought India their greatest victory were given 1 lac rupees each for their efforts while their successors ,who would capitalize on the tidal wave they had unleashed, would get more than a million dollars for a month of mediocrity. I shall neither talk about a heartless BCCI, the biggest beneficiary of June 25 1983, penalizing and humiliating those same heroes for trying to make a living by joining an “un-approved” league nor about how I refused to pay up a bet I lost (a Re 1 rasogolla bet I had made with my uncle that India would lose the semi-final)

I shall also decline to mention that with that victory, Indian cricket lost its innocence for ever as bookies and big money came into the game ultimately casting its pernicious shadow on the greatest Knight of the Prudential World Cup and his legacy.

And why would I omit these?

Because grandparents exist only to tell wondrous stories with happy endings.

As for teaching the not-so-pleasant lessons to the little ones—well life, as it always does, shall take care of that.

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86 thoughts on “Legends and Heroes

  1. Everybody realized the power of South Indians after the World Cup win in 1983. India won the cup just because of Kris Srikanth’s batting heroics. He destroyed their bowling attack and scored highest. Otherwise, all the efforts of the Indian bowlers would have gone in vain. But unfortunately, Srikanth has not been recognized and man of the final award went to Amarnath whereas the more deserving candidate is Srikanth.

  2. @Raghu: Indeed.

    @Abhishek: Just missed it.

    @Rohit: Thanks

    @Kishor: True true. It was only due to the efforts of South Indians like Kapil, Amarnath, Yashpal Sharma and Madan Lal that we got into the final. And Amarnath definitely did not deserve the MoM…after all he just got 3 wickets for 12 runs and scored 26 runs.

  3. “Because grandparents exist only to tell wondrous stories with happy endings.

    As for teaching the not-so-pleasant lessons to the little ones—well life, as it always does, shall take care of that.

    Well, the post was ok, but this comment was just too good and true 🙂

  4. “True true. It was only due to the efforts of South Indians like Kapil, Amarnath, Yashpal Sharma and Madan Lal that we got into the final. And Amarnath definitely did not deserve the MoM…after all he just got 3 wickets for 12 runs and scored 26 runs.”
    GB-That was even better than the post.
    Hee Hee

  5. Yeah, I know sometimes it becomes difficult to chose man of the match, especially when more than one player performs exceedingly well. But my grouse is that even Indian government ignored Srikanth. He should have been awarded padmashree or padmabhushan for his heroic deeds in the final.

  6. I dont know how many people will agree with me, but I think srikanth is the second most overhyped batsman of india, first one has to be ravi shastri.

  7. “True true. It was only due to the efforts of South Indians like Kapil, Amarnath, Yashpal Sharma and Madan Lal that we got into the final. And Amarnath definitely did not deserve the MoM…after all he just got 3 wickets for 12 runs”

    ha ha ha

  8. @ Kishor

    U r wrong my dear friend, Srikanth shud hav been given da Bharat Ratna……….or maybe the noble prize………

  9. @ Optician

    I think Dhoni is da 2nd most over-hyped cric8r, 1st 1 being Ravi Shastri ofcourse….. Srikanth cums at no.3

  10. Beautifully written GB. This and the other post. I was not yet born the day our heroes lifted the cup but have watched the matches many a times on tv and read the World Cup cricket 1983 book (I think the one by Peter Allan Murray. not sure though). Your description flashed everything back 😀

    And I would agree to the fact that that Windies side was much more than today’s Aussies. coz they had monsters like Viv. Watching him stride onto the field gives me shivers even today. Wonder what happened to the bowlers.
    And that team had quality pace bowlers. People like Marshall and Roberts who could even get a well set Gavaskar out batting on a 100 or so. To bowl that unplayable delivery. That does not happen these days. once a batsman is set, he gets out more or less coz of his own mistakes…

    And also, what you said about miracles is so true. I witnessed myself once. When the so-called invincibles went wicketless at Eden Gardens. I was there.. When a very very special man displayed his craftsmanship with blissful elegance..

  11. Great post! Especially funny was the bit about thin arrowroot biscuit with tea. Seems like this hallowed Bong tradition will survive even when you are a grandparent. 🙂

  12. Srikanth is the first batsman for India who played with guts and who never bothered about opposition bowler’s reputation. His batting defied tradition and his range of shots is truly great. Even his stance at batting crease is amazing. Even his comeback in 91/92 Australia tri-series is great. He is the only batsman who scored again West Indies/Australian pace attack (of course, Sachin also contributed in that series). He is a very good field with amazing eyesight. He has not received his due just because he is a South Indian wherese as people sing hosannahs for even mediocre players like vengsarkar and ravishastri still. I advise people watch videos of Srikanth’s innings to know about his batting and fielding before commenting on him.

  13. Now you’re talking.
    Please write many more posts like these coz they really get me and many more like me, very emotional and superiorly happy.
    Thank you Arnab.

  14. I used to study in a residential school in Kurseong & was in class 7 when the 83 world cup was won by us. I still remember very vividly how I sat awake that magical night in front of a radio bought for this occassion by our games teacher who gave it to us since there use to be no T.V in the dormetories.
    WE were then all allowed to have a go downstairs in the cold june night of kurseong to have a bonfire in celebration by the same games Sir.
    Thanks GB for bringing back those woderful days right in front of the eyes again.
    OOh we did have a look at the ball to ball highlights shown the next morning or so (I dont remember exactly)at the Games Teacher’s place.

  15. I pray that people dont turn your fascinating blog into the “Rascal like regional hatred board of rediff”. I think in near future you have to spend some time to erase these ludicrous regional buffs.

  16. enjoyed this post a lot GB. definitely ur best in recent times…
    I agree with Kishor, without the effort of ‘South Indians’ in the team Indian team could have never gotten a famous victory at Lords. I think all the ‘North Indians’ should be kicked out of the present team so that justice could be served to K. Shrikanth.

  17. ‘thin arrowroot’ …. classic!

    As an aside, I’m glad my generation (those born in the 80s) at least got to witness the T20 world cup win. Going by theories of how ODIs are headed for extinction, India may never win another ODI world cup. But yes, ’83 was the one that started it all.

  18. Good post.
    Before 1983, the BCCI was virtually bankrupt. 1983 and 1985 bought the crowd, corporates and cash. BCCI’s transformation to the richest body and world cricket bully owes it to this squad. Good way to repay by insulting Kapil and others who joined ICL. This is one of the main reasons why I have been supporting the ICL, the other being BCCI’s treatment of its first class players.

    Regarding the paltry Rs. 1 lakh, that was possible only because of a fund raising concert by Lata Mangeshkar. It was that bad for the BCCI.

    The BCCI has given Rs. 25 lakhs to each team member. Which is paltry considering Parthiv Patel and Agarkar got Rs. 92 lakhs for their hard work (namely warming the benches, giving practice) in the 2003 World Cup.

  19. Hi GB,

    I have been reading your mails for quite some time now and have become a ‘fan’ (not AC as Lalu Yadav said Shahrukh in one of the Panchvi Pass episodes).

    You are original- and this post is one of the strongest claims to that.

    Keep writing

  20. “perennially under-performing nation”.. good description. Also it comes a full circle given our current affair with mediocrity.

    As with every honest comment or tribute follows regionalism so does yours.

  21. Hi GB,

    I’m a regular reader of all your posts but haven’t really got around to commenting on them as you pretty much summarise everything and hardly leave anything for us to comment upon 🙂
    Yes, i vividly remember DD’s blankout after the first couple of wickets and then me as a 7 year old listening to the commentary on the radio till DD’s coverage came back. By that time, even Lloyd was out. But still, there was an element of uncertainty as India was known to underperform. I vividly remember next day’s TOI proudly proclaiming us as world champions. Those were the days, man… how i miss those days. Of course, the win in 1985 was just as sweet coming as it did against Pak. A request here – why don’t you put in a piece about that 1985 B & H series (unless u’ve already done so)

    Thanks for all the memories!

  22. ahh..memories..evening 6.45pm..me with bat in hand..friends on balconies..shouting at each wicket..radio blaring in the south west corner of the park..I cannot concentrate on my batting..give up..Kapil takes that catch..our cricket forgotten..uncles happily giving the most “vaunted” swearwords at the Windians..Amarnath bowling..Marshall gone..the surge of the imminent victory..us doing the devil dance after the win..the radio blaring away forgotten..Pushpo kakima being kissed by an unknown kaku??!!
    Ufff…What a day!!

  23. Hey GB, how come 3 years back you said your bet with your Uncle was a Rajbhog and now you claim it was a Rasogolla??? Nice post though! Great going!

  24. @Skeptic
    I think when GB would be a grandpa , his grandchildren wont be able to associate with a rajbhog !!! so rasogolla is the closest approximation

  25. Kishor – get f** out of here.

    Anybody who saw Kris Srikanth captain India in 1989 will be shocked that he deserves an iota of respect. The man was a total utter embarrassment of a skipper on the Pakistan tour. He had a slacker beard and even slackier batting attitude. The only saving grace that year was the arrival of the arrival of a 16 yr old Sachin Tendulkar.

    And before you start whining, I am from South India.

  26. ha how many knew Sunny Gavaskar was the sheriff of Bombay and a sai baba devotee .Yes Rajdeep Desai reunion CNN IBN ,couldn’t miss that connection OLD NEW filum stars dressing room etc.
    looks like there are still four at least to me,i counted on my fingers ,including my forefinger, prufrock’s asleep ,’SATC’ on FULL SWING ,where else ,on a very very compulsive blog and well looks like the ladies have actually delivered down south.congrats shoe-fiend .no no not grand children just one giant-push at a time.phew I ALMOST fell asleep online we still exist.

  27. The team:

    * Mohinder Amarnath
    * Kirti Azad
    * Roger Binny
    * Kapil Dev (captain)
    * Sunil Gavaskar
    * Syed Kirmani (wicketkeeper)
    * Madan Lal
    * Sandeep Patil
    * Balwinder Sandhu
    * Yashpal Sharma
    * Kris Srikkanth

    * Ravi Shastri
    * Sunil Valson
    * Dilip Vengsarkar

  28. Well, if not this match, I will definitely tell about the 20 – 20 final match to my grand kids!

    India Pakistan in a world cup final and India wins .. that’s a fairy tale!

  29. Well said, GB, Well said.

    Sadly, I was just four *months* old then, and can only look back in second-hand pleasure at videos of the victory.

  30. Manu,

    Kishor-gaaru is the self-proclaimed “Mega Star” of Satire – Southern Style, mind you.

    His long, track record on RTDM is good enough to show him as our jovial, resident Quick Gun Murugan type.

    Kishor’s fat uncle – the other “Mega Star” (Chiranjeevi)- is trying hard to convince Kishor to become his speech-writer for his new political party “Mana Desam”.

    But all Kishor wants to do is read RTDM and write code in Cyberabad, right man?

    Bengal Voice

  31. GB, how about trying a hand at creative writing? Have had quite a lot of your observations on the worldly issues…..please write something from your own…..that’d make up for some interesting reading, for sure. 🙂

  32. @Kishor
    I didn’t realize power of South Indians till I read your message and there are millions like me. May be you can start blogging to educate people. http://greatmadrasi.net is not taken yet may be you can register it.

  33. Splendid post, after a few not so splendid ones lately !
    It was good to see Kapil getting his due, from the monstrous BCCI, who have now banned the ICL players from champions league , after a lot of flip flop. Why not a post on BCCI ? They have got quite a few ‘characters’.
    Meanwhile, I saw the telecast of the felicitation ceremony.Kapil is not half as good at speaking, as he is at playing :). It was hilarious to see him introduce his team on stage, in which he described almost every player as ‘a very unique ‘ one. But yes, he is equally endearing, whatever he does.

  34. Good post.

    Eh…so you were a 7 year old kid & most of the other commenters were also small kids during the WC’83 triumph ?

    Am I the lone old guy who’s 40 plus & an unabashed GB admirer ?

  35. i was 3 & my first memories of life ( extremely hazy ones at that) comprise a picture perfect bihari joint family & hoardes of neighbors flocking around a new Weston TV set & shouting with glee for reasons beyond my comprehension then. how i wish to have acclerated my mental growth to dance with them in joy 🙂
    then on…kapil was god, gavaskar an artist, srikanth a lovable maverick & amarnath, sandhu, binny etc. what gully cricketers would call each other!! thanks GB for the nostalgia trip.

  36. trip down memory lane… no way!
    I was not even conceptualized.
    But with your long sentences and commas, I can imagine the scenario; tea-stall, radio, Kapil Dev and how old you are writer. Well written.
    Do you still draw and paint?

  37. “As for teaching the not-so-pleasant lessons to the little ones—well life, as it always does, shall take care of that.”

    Very good. I really appreciated that line.

    Born as I was about a month after the win, I cannot claim to be a first row observer to the wild night, as neel so beautifully puts it. I do remember the night we won against South Africa in the 1993 Hero Cup semifinal. That was something similar and one which I will savour for long. I really don’t know whether victories nowadays evoke the same pujor-moja type celebrations anymore. But I cherish those days.

    While the post was a beautifully written one (and much more enjoyable to read than stuff about lambu atta 🙂 ), it seems a parochial flame war has started in the comments section. And frankly, it is bloody pissing me off! I, and as I am sure most of the readers of your blog arnabda, absolutely do not see the point of these posts. I am sure most of us will be more than happy if you delete such posts in the future.

  38. I am not parochial, but i really felt very bad when GB missed to mention Srikanth who contributed maximum number of runs and gave confidence to the following batsmen. His batting against the likes of Andy Roberts and Marshal is spectacular.

  39. 1983 in England. No helmets and body pads, bouncers galore, raw unpredictable pitches. a quick eye and sure feet were just about enough to get you by. winning in those conditions? the indian team of the day were a fitter lot, thanks to the fitness obsessed Gavaskar, Jimmy, and Kapil. they were lean, mean, hungry and supremely confident. remember this was the Kapil who a few years before in his debut series in Pakistan had reduced Sarfaraz Nawaz to a nervous wreck in Lahore in his 2nd Test, peppering him with the short stuff. and then he went on to thrash the self-same Sarfaraz all over the park till the umpires declared Kapil lbw! That’s the same Kapil who in one evening of blistering batting in Chepauk, ground the great Imran Khan into the dust, carelessly hooking him for a six!

  40. Kaangeya, no helmets in 1983 final? Did u really watch the video ? Balwinder Sandhu would have been dead if he were not wearing a helmet on that day.

  41. A lovely post Arnab. I liked the tone and tenor of the whole piece. Quite off your usual track, but very compelling. Not that I share much enthusiasm for the world cup. (Though I do have vague memories of the event. I must have been 9-10 years then). But I share your sense of nostalgia albeit with the slight(only slight) pass-by to the rose-tint we bathe our past in. Whatever we get nostalgic about, the hues we colur our nostalgia remain the same. And your post somehow evokes an acute sense of nostalgia.

    The best part of your post? These snippets

    1. After all, it is the prerogative of the tellers of history to be able to add something of themselves in the story they tell.

    Else how can history become legend and ultimately myth?”

    2. As for teaching the not-so-pleasant lessons to the little ones—well life, as it always does, shall take care of that.

    Delicious! 🙂

  42. Too bad, I was not even a week old on that day. My parents would later jokingly “rebuke” me that because of me(my birth), they were robbed of such once-in-a-lifetime extravaganza.

  43. Nice perspective GB! I was two years old. Some gem lines in there incuding he last one!

    @Kishor: How about Roger Binny, the highest wicket taker and MOM against Australia, I guess you have another reason now!

  44. Hi great blog . Im very much impressed with ur blog . . . Shall WE have link exchange . I want to be ur blog friend . . Add my blog in ur blogroll pls . . I ll add ur’s now

  45. To Greatbong,
    Well this is weird..coz my comment is regarding ur post on Satyajit Ray’s trilogy…ami just porlam..and i was overwhelmed..Truly ur writing style is fantastic and language is superb…and needless to say, the thoughts that you have put up are so very true. Being a probashi bangali, my childhood unfortunately never got to be a part of Ray’s works…though i remember seeing Pather panchali wen i was a kid..and not understanding anything…but then as i grew up..ma felt its necessary to inculcate some bangaliness, and thats when i was exposed to the beauty and magic of Ray’s cinema. Ami janina ki bolle i can manage to put forth my feelings exactly..and i fear that this might take eons..so simply i say that..Satyajit Ray, was,is and always will be my Guru..and thnx to ur reviews..i can look at some beautiful words to go with my thoughts..Salaam Satyajit..
    Trisha

  46. Anna Deeps,

    Thank you very much anna. How did I miss that Roger Binny is from Karnataka.

    Yeah, 1983 World Cup win is just because of South Indians and the cup should belong to South India only.

  47. Thanks Arnab for reliving some happy memories. I was about 14 years old then and thank God that I heard the commentary till the last ball.

    Great write-up sir. It seems you are back!!!

  48. Kishor said:

    “Yeah, 1983 World Cup win is just because of South Indians and the cup should belong to South India only.”

    ROTFL !!!!

  49. I loved your update. I wish you could write in Hindi too. For whatever reasons translations lose their meaning. I yearn to read some good hindi pieces. But for now your blog(and few others) keep us busy.

    Thank You for all this good work.

  50. Wow.. your update was really cool 🙂

    Well, I didn’t see the match but I have heard about the semi-final more than any other match :p

  51. i too, sat in front of the tv. was in class 11. and whoopied and banged a degchi in celebration on the terrace.

    yes kishor, w.g. grace was also from south india.

  52. Great post GB. This one is priceless:
    “well life, as it always does, shall take care of that.”

    I am amazed how people ignore the beautiful post and start posting hate comments to each other.

    Makes me sad!!

  53. I was a very very old man in Benaras, when we won the world cup.The world cup meant nothing to me. I died that day later only to be reborn ed again in oct 84, and now when we all speak of 25 yrs of the world cup victory, i can imagine what a lonely death it would have been… you prepare for a long journey while India celebrates.

    and by the way i think Kishore IS Shrikant.

  54. Shrikant aint dead yet! lol. And Srikant was a little overrated , he was as good as Sehwag for thier ODI records are pretty similiar! Inconsistent, similiar average for smiliar amount of runs, strike rate diffrent but both played in different eras.

  55. nice post GB… i was 8 years and wondering why my uncles were banging the thaalis in the balcony and screaming at the pitch of their voice “We Won We Won, Champions, Saras” n all.. sweet ignorance you see…

    @Kishore..
    I thought that India won the World Cup and not South or North Or East India.. requesting you to please stop this it presents us all in a very bad light. just enjoy the memories yaar and chill.. Is pal ko jee le yaar 🙂

    @All.. requesting all to please stop responding to Kishor’s comment.

  56. @to all who came in late

    we ENJOY kishor.
    we expect him to put a touch of rasam in every topic, to dosafy every theme and spread liberal doses of coconut chutney on every subject.

    to him, everything south of the vindhyas, ootacamund-australia-antarctika, are all components of south india.

    the more outrageous the comment, the more the a la kishor.

    as for hate comments, oh ho, there are other posts where it flows like a forty day flood!

  57. Optician, also when GB will be a grandpa he won’t be eating arrowroot biscuits — more likely to be American choco-chip cookies or some such!

  58. Its interesting that for all our current passion for cricket, there were hardly any 1983 World Cup players from W.Bengal ?

    Even guys Arun Lal or Dilip Doshi (Calcutta University alumnus) weren’t lucky or talented enough or too old to make it to the 1983 World Cup team.

    Atleast from what I can remember, the entry of Saurav Ganguly was sort of a watershed when interest in cricket peaked in Kolkata.

    Until then, it was mostly football (soccer) i.e. East Bengal vs. Mohun Bagan rivalries that somehow captivated the Bengali masses – players like Babu Mani, Chima Okerie, Chibuzor notwithstanding.

    Hey Kishor, did you know that Babu Mani was from the south of the Vindhyas too? 🙂

  59. your previous post on the victory (The Day We Won The Cup) was so good, so perfect, so beautifully written that i thought it would be impossible for anyone – even you – to write anything more on the win without diluting the quality of what you had already written.
    i’ve never been so glad to be proved wrong!
    wonderful post GB, i was 1 year old, but even after seeing numerous replays of the match, i felt as if i had REALLY watched it only after reading your posts.

    p.s: kishor, keep them coming, your comments are looked forward to as much as GB’s posts!

  60. As we had no TV at home then, had been to a neighbour’s flat to watch the match that famous evening. When Viv started his blitzkrieg, felt that I should not be missing out on dinner because of the expected humiliation staring us in the face. (yes, those days my appetite was largely controlled by the results of an Indian cricket match!) So I returned home and did not even have the nerve to switch on radio commentary as I sat at the table, despondency swallowing me with every gulp. And then came the roar from the nearby para club – Kapil had managed to do the near impossible by clutching on to the straws of hope – I left behind my unfinished plate and my screaming mother to scamper back to my seat in front of the TV. After all there was another all-important agenda to be finished : to goad the devils into weaving magic and scripting a pure and pristine cricket dhamaka. Somersaults followed in the rain-drenched streets as we yelled and danced like crazy late into the night.

  61. I sincerely apologize for all the biased and nonsensical comments I posted before. I have been drinking too much lately and once I’m drunk I love to visit RTDM which explains my stupid comments. I’m seeking medical help to rid myself of this problem. I agree that it was team effort and no particular region – east, west, north, or south – should be given special credit for that memorable tournament.

  62. This comment above was in all probability not made by Kishor as the IP as well as email address that Kishor generally provides did not match those of this comment.

  63. Hello GB:

    I don’t who wrote the above comment using my name. This is extremely unfair on that person’s part. They should not misuse the comments column this way.

    Sincerely I am not the one who wrote the above comment. I request all not to misuse my name.

    Kishor

  64. LOL…..RTFL..

    @ kishor

    hey what about your comments on the current indian team..with so many south indians in the ranks…team is not really performing up to standard without enough idli sambhar…

    BTW Ravi Shastri is originally from Karnataka thus making him somewhat your brethren…what an amazing dashing batsman..great strike rate

    Also include Sri Lanka in your definition of Southies and u have got a real world champion team..murli, vaas etc wow

    must be something in the chennai water or rather lack of water…on that note how about the Cauvery water crisis being resolved by a match betn TN & Karnataka

  65. Loved your Roger Binny-JLo comparison in your other post – referenced here. Did you know that Binny’s nickname in the team was “Jack” (as in Jackfruit)?

  66. @GB,
    Looking at the comment by the fake Kishor to glorify our good old kishor the original the only thing that comes to my mind is the day when the comment is posted (29th June’08) was the first time when there were gay parades performed in 3 cities of India. The link is undeniable (according to me that is)…

  67. @optician,

    I didn’t see the fake Kishor’s comment an attempt to glorify real Kishor. On the contrary, I found that comment to be a humorous one and an attempt to embarrass real Kishor. Were you in the gay parade that day, hence the effort to bring everyone into your tribe? You need a brain scan, in addition to eye testing.

  68. @all,

    i dont know if i am correct but is Kishor-impersonator the above anonymous? Only GB can tell…

    But the flow of emotions and suggestions point likewise…

    Also I really think i need an eye testing as I have been unable to figure out the effort on my part to bring everyone into “my” tribe ???

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